TEL Pedagogy Principles2018-08-20T16:36:30+10:00

TEL PEDAGOGY PRINCIPLES

Before you start designing your TEL environments it is important to consider pedagogical principles. While you are reviewing the following principles, reflect on how these might be applied in your current teaching practices and how they might be employed in a technology-rich learning environment.

KEY PRINCIPLES

Before you start designing your TEL environments it is important to consider pedagogical principles. While you are reviewing the following principles, reflect on how these might be applied in your current teaching practices and how they might be employed in a technology-rich learning environment.

To read more about the theory behind active and social learning environments refer to Harry Daniels’ Vygotsky and Pedagogy (2016) which is available as on online book through the WSU library.

Students have choices in how they learn

Units are designed to accommodate opportunities for discussion in the co-construction of knowledge (social constructivism) and to work through learning materials independently (self-regulated learning).

Units are designed to incorporate branching scenarios/activities to facilitate and encourage students to make decisions and select the appropriate pathway/s for their learning. This give student a sense of ownership of their learning.

Effective student learning occurs when knowledge is constructed through a process of reflection and collaboration in social learning environments. The emphasis on the importance of reflection and the role of social learning environments in student learning derives from theorists such as Dewey, Piaget and Vygotsky.

Learning is inclusive of non-traditional students

This refers to low SES first in family, part-time working adults.

  • Asynchronous options are available to accommodate different time zones and work schedules.
  • Learning activities emphasise video, audio, infographics and interactives rather than lengthy reading materials.
  • Reading material is clustered as ‘essential’ and ‘additional’.
  • Assessments are redesigned to optimise the learning for students.
  • Group work is reduced and students are supported in assessment completion.
  • First stage units incorporate an early low stakes assessment either machine marked or allowing for a draft submission and/or resubmission option.

Use analogies to map a new idea onto one that students already know. It is important to elaborate on the analogies and direct students to the crucial similarities between existing and new knowledge/ideas (Richland et al 2007). This will promote deep learning and encourage students to craft their own curation.

Leverage from a student’s work and life experience

Learning activities and assessments enable students to build on their existing knowledge and contextualise their learning. Assessments are authentic and promote meaningful learning aligned to the appropriate industry and professional practice. Infuse the design of learning and assessment activities with experiences that trigger emotions, actions, perceptions and cognition that are memorable and have personal significance to the student. This helps to promote intrinsic motivation for learning.

Optimise learning opportunities and minimise user experience challenges

Technology requirements are minimised, especially in first stage units. The design is underpinned by the aim of reducing cognitive load of the technology to ensure that the navigation of learning materials navigation is as seamless as possible. This helps to increase and maintain student engagement. A consistent approach to unit design and navigation is applied through the discipline. Students are provided with all the resources required to support their learning and assessments within the learning management system.

Immediacy of feedback will also reinforce the presence of the teacher. The presence of the teacher is one of key dimensions of an online learning environment (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 2010)

Students are supported through their learning journey

Facilitators and tutors are available to provide academic, administrative, technical and pastoral support for students across extended hours, seven days per week.

  • Online facilitators provide timely unit specific academic support and high quality
  • feedback on assessment tasks. This is an important practice because effective and immediate feedback is essential for students to acquire new knowledge and skills (Ericsson et al 1993).
  • Assessment exemplars are provided to students in early stage units.
  • Assessments are returned to students within two weeks.
  • Opportunities for self-assessment and self-checking are provided.
  • Administrative processes are minimised and streamlined so student learning is maximized.

Students develop capability as they advance through their course

During early stage units it is important to:

  • Maximise the formative learning opportunities and the development of academic skills such as referencing and academic writing skills.
  • Scaffold the learning process to guide students through complex ideas.
  • Utilise assessment tasks as being for, as and of learning.

Provide students with access to open learning landscapes or open collaborative areas beyond ‘class times’.

This aims to encourage students to form their own community of learning to promote the formation of a community of learning or ‘sticky’ spaces where they can share and create more opportunities to learn from their peers and build relationships. these learning communities can hence make students feel connected and can help to increase student retention (Centre for 21st Century Universities, Georgia Institute of Technology, 2013).

Learning prepares students for success in their professional outcome

Units and courses are mapped to professional learning outcomes.
Links to professional requirements and industry practices are made at appropriate places in each unit.

Student with disabilities are supported effectively

  • Universal design principles are applied and monitored.
  • Best practice guidance on Universal Design and inclusive teaching in blended learning contexts are provided.
  • All videos/podcasts are transcribed.
  • Students with disabilities are considered in the development of learning resources.

RESOURCES

These are all examples of living principles and it is important to consider how you might apply these in your unit. Please use the following plan as a tool to help you reflect on how you can apply these principles in your unit.

TEL Planner

Please use the following plan as a tool to help you reflect on how you can apply these principles in your unit.

Download TEL Learning Planner (PDF)